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Ace Cafe in Orlando

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Ace Cafe in Orlando -Official website

100 W. Livingston Street, Orlando, Fl 32801,

Ace Cafe, a British-based motorcycle brand, is making their debut into North America, and has selected Downtown Orlando as the first U.S. destination.

Ace Cafe will be an ideal location for motorcycle enthusiasts and provide entertainment for residents and tourists alike. Notorious in motorcycle, car and rock ’n roll culture, Ace Cafe Orlando will be a roadside gastro-diner, with fresh, creative, comfort food, and will serve as a restaurant, cafe, bar, event space and music venue.

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The Ace Cafe was established in 1938 on the then brand new North Circular Road surrounding London. It was a simple roadside Cafe catering to travelers, particularly truckers. With its proximity to Britain’s fast arterial road network, and being open 24 hours, the Ace Cafe soon attracted motorcyclists too.

People came to listen to the jukebox, many subsequently starting bands or clubs. Some gaining success and considerable reputation.

From this powerful fusion of motorbikes and Rock ‘n’ Roll came the legends of record-racing, “drop the coin right into the slot”, and race to a given point and back before the record finished.

The Ace Cafe, with its combination of motorbikes, speed and Rock ‘n’ Roll was the launchpad for many famous racers and the birthplace for many bands.

Ace Building Archive 1938 x 1A

he original Ace Cafe opened in 1938 on North Circular Road in London. Planned as a transport cafe for truck and lorry drivers, it quickly became a place where motorbike riders gathered. An icon to English motorcyclists, it also has a significance for bikers elsewhere in the world.

In the early fifties the Ace Cafe became the destination for a new breed of bikers. The post-war generation, bored by old values and conventions and confronted with social changes, were searching for their identity. There were two significant influences: Rock n’ roll and motorbikes. Leather jackets and jeans were worn, creating the black leather rebel cult. They lived on the fringes of society and were generally ostracised by “motorcycle enthusiasts.” The young bikers developed their own identity and with it a tremendous group feeling. They met in cafes and rock n’ roll clubs, arranging races on London’s North Circular Road. They rode the hell out of their engines as they raced on their unofficial circuit. A general speed limit, when introduced, only added to the challenge.

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Shunned by bourgeois middle-class society, the Ton-up boys attracted a lot of young people to their ranks and had a significant influence on the youth culture. Rock n’ roll was their music, their uniform was black leather, their lives were wild and full of danger. The driving beat of the music was the rhythm, the drug was speed. Though most of the original influences were adopted from America, they were integrated and developed into a unique British phenomena. The bikes at that time, some of the best and the fastest, were English, and British musicians were as much admired as their American counterparts. By then the Ace Cafe had become the launchpad for many famous racers such as Dave Degans and rock n’ roll bands like Johnny Kidd and The Pirates.

The riders who met at the Ace had their own sets of rules and codes, neither understood nor recognized by outsiders. Their wild and martial appearance didn’t fit within conventional norms. Their racing, their music and the very distinctive way of expressing themselves frightened polite society and sensational press articles fanned the hysteria for all they could. Government officials often discussed counter-measures to be taken against these youths now known as Rockers.


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